Tag Archives: book

Day Three of Three-Day Quote Challenge

Yay! I am in the final leg of The Three-Day Quote Challenge. I was nominated for it by Debolina. A big thanks again to her for the nomination. I totally enjoyed doing this!

Today it is my turn to nominate three other wonderful bloggers. But before that here’s my final quote of the challenge:

Quote for Day 3 of 3-Day Quote Challenge

Quote for Day 3 of 3-Day Quote Challenge

Ever tried to have someone in your life who was hell bent to leave? What was the process of forgetting that person like? Is it only Time that heals wounds or does the Distance between you and the perpetrator of hurt count too? For the narrator of the story Elusive ( from Bound by Life, my first Kindle ebook), distance worked positively and helped him to forget his childhood ladylove.

But is the world so big that we can just forget and move on? To find out, you have to read Bound by Life. You can download the book here.

Now, time to announce my nominees!

My Nominees

Mr. Shreedeep Gangopadhyay  (The Violet Diary)

Ms. Swagata Mukherjee (Through my Eyes)

Ms. Jahnavi Chintakunta (Recharge your Day)

Dear Nominees, Please keep in mind the following rules for your quote-posts:

Rules for Three-Day Quote Challenge!

  1. Thank the blogger, who nominated you.
  2. Publish 3 quotes on 3 consecutive days in your blog. It can be your own, or from a book, movie or from anyone who inspires you.
  3. Nominate 3 more bloggers to carry on this endeavour.

Courtesy: Debolina’s blog

My heartiest congratulations to all the nominees. I am looking forward to your quotes. And don’t forget to pass on the baton on the third day.

Happy quoting!

~Arpita

Day One of Three-Day Quote Challenge

Good day bloggers all over the world!

Usually, I blog on Wednesdays and Saturdays. I will make an exception today as I have been nominated by the wonderful Debolina for the three-day quote challenge. Yay! Thank you so much, Debolina, for the nomination. Debolina has previously contributed a guest post for this blog – a review of Little Women as part of Saturday Specials in July. Be sure to check it out!

As a part of the 3-Day quote challenge, I will publish one quote each for three consecutive days. On the third day, I will nominate three other bloggers for the same who will then continue the challenge. The quotes may be taken from a book, a movie or anywhere else. It can even be your own creation.

My quote for today is taken from the first story of my book Bound by Life. The protagonist of this story (The Silent Victim), Deepa, was a victim of molestation as a child and grew up struggling with androphobia. These lines are her realization:

Quote for Day 1 of 3-Day Quote Chalenge

Quote for Day 1 of 3-Day Quote Challenge

Deepa is one of the strongest characters of my first book. I am immensely proud of her and where she reaches by the end of the story. If you’re interested in her story, don’t forget to buy my book on Amazon.

Keep blogging and have a great weekend!

Best,

~Arpita

Review of To Kill a Mockingbird – A Guest Post

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Today’s guest post in Re-living the Classics is a review of To Kill a Mockingbird by the wonderful Belinda. I love reading her beautiful personal anecdotes! Be sure to check out her site!

Would you like to have your review of your favourite classic featured on this blog? To do that, contact me through the form given after today’s post. Be sure to mention your name, email and the name of the book you wish to review. Thank you!


Review of To Kill a Mockingbird

Guest Post by Belinda

First, thanks to Arpita for this opportunity to review one of my all-time favorite books. While I originally had planned to take a look at Madame Bovary, current events and the imminent release of Harper Lee’s second book (Go Set a Watchman, July 14, 2015) compelled me to change my mind.

to-kill-a-mockingbird2To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee (1960) is a story of a small town in the southern U.S., where things move slowly but certainly, and a small spark of hope for the future exists. It’s a tale of friendships, family and the forgotten, and how in the end they all fight for each other.

It’s also a story of vast racial injustice and a man not willing to be resigned to it until he’s forced to be. Mostly, it’s the tale of girl growing up and learning about all that happens and all who live in this small town she calls home.

Jean Louise Finch, who goes by Scout, lives with her brother, Jem, and father, Atticus, in the fictional town of Maycomb, Alabama.  Scout and Jem befriend a boy named Dill, who visits his aunt each year during the summer months.

Scout, Jem and Dill are fascinated by their reclusive and ostensibly frightening neighboring, Boo Radley. For two summers they watch and wait for him to appear. The third year, they’re bewildered to find small gestures of friendship seemingly from the shy man, yet still don’t catch sight of him.

That same year Atticus is appointed to defend a black man accused of raping a white woman. The entire town becomes captivated by the trial, and the consequences of the outcome shape events for months to come in a dramatic and poignant way.

The children’s fascination with Boo and the unfolding of events that follow the trial come together in the final pages in a way true to the rest of the story, the town and its characters.  This type of ending to such a complex story is rare. So often the plot line becomes convoluted or melodramatic.  Not the case here.

 The books narrative style is fluid, with bits of irony used to communicate the complex issues it covers. It’s a story you can read time and again, always with a different perspective: once with a look at racial injustice, another with an eye to class and culture in the American South of the early 20th century. It addresses human nature on a broader scale in the character of Boo Radley and how the town dealt with him in their words and actions.

I can’t recommend this book enough. It captivates me from the first sentence every time I read it, which is about once every three or four years. I couldn’t wait to read it again for this review, and look forward already to the next time.


Would you like to have your review of your favourite classic featured on this blog? To do that contact me through the form given below. Be sure to mention your name, email and the name of the book you wish to review. Thank you!